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Recognizing Power, Perspective and Standpoint: Using a Race Analysis for Problem Solving and Program Development

  • 06/01/2016
  • 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM (CDT)
  • Center for Change
  • 3

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Recognizing Power, Perspective and Standpoint:  Using a Race Analysis for Problem Solving and Program Development

This session will help social justice agency participants use a racial justice and equity lens in their programming and planning.

Some social justice organizations may consider mission to exclude the issues of race and racial justice.  Organizations that focus on the physical environment or political efficacy, or justice for folks in other intersectional marginalized groups may not recognize a need for a race analysis in their work because of its broad or “universal” impact.

This session is designed to help participants think about their mission and the many social justice intersections at their particular point of focus.  Participants will get information on how to consider every aspect of their work, including hiring, strategic planning, decision making and general program planning with a racial justice lens or a racial equity impact assessment. 

Bonus:  This information and discussion in this session will help participant think about the other intersectional issues they might use to analyze their work and programming.

Jacquelyn L. Boggess is the Executive Director of the Center for Family Policy and Practice.  Ms. Boggess has worked with the Center since its inception in 1995 wherein she has concentrated on services for low-income families, and on low-income men as parents.  From this perspective, she has contributed her analysis to the national conversation on the impact of government initiated income security policy, and child support policy on the economic stability of the poorest individuals and families. Her particular interest is the connections and relations among these systems, and how social welfare policy and practice that result from this relationship particularly negatively impact effect low-income fathers, mothers and children of color and communities of color.  Her work in this regard has resulted in connections and collaborations with battered women’s advocates, anti-violence organizations and progressive advocacy groups working on social welfare policy, poverty reduction, violence prevention, and economic justice for parents and children.

Ms. Boggess is a graduate of University of Wisconsin Law School and the University of Illinois-Champaign. 



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